Chiropractic Milestones in Canada

1845
Birth of D.D. Palmer in Port Perry, Ontario.

1902
The first chiropractors enter Canada from the United States.

1911
Robbins Chiropractic College in Sault Ste. Marie opens.

1922
Toronto Chiropractic College opens.

1923
Alberta passes the first Chiropractic Act in Canada.

1925
Ontario passes the Drugless Practitioners Act.

1934
British Columbia passes a Chiropractic Act.

1937
The Workman’s Compensation Board of Ontario includes chiropractic benefits in treatment provided for injured workers.

1943
Saskatchewan passes a Chiropractic Act.

1945
Manitoba enacts chiropractic legislation.

The Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College opens in Toronto at 252 Bloor Street West. It was established by the Dominion Council of Canadian Chiropractors under a separate charter grated by the province of Ontario.

1947
The Henderson building, featuring modern classrooms, laboratories and an auditorium, opens in September.

1949
CMCC first graduation.

1950
The Anatomy Act of Ontario is amended allowing CMCC to teach human dissection, along with only six other universities and colleges.

By this time, the Workman’s Compensation Boards in British Columbia, Alberta and Manitoba have added chiropractic care to include coverage. Saskatchewan and New Brunswick follow soon after.

1953
The Dominion Council of Canadian Chiropractors receives its charter from the Government of Canada changing its name to the Canadian Chiropractic Association. All provincial associations become divisions of the new national organization.

1956
The Canadian Chiropractic Association opens its offices in Toronto.

1957
Entrance requirements for CMCC are raised from four years of high school to five.

The Canadian Chiropractic Journal is established.

1959
The City of Toronto expropriates a strip of land through CMCC’s assembled properties for the new Bloor subway.

1960
Subway construction interferes with teaching at CMCC and laboratories are relocated to facilities in nearby buildings.

1961
The Hall Commission is appointed “inquire into…the need for health services for the people of Canada and the resources to provide such services”.

The Canadian Chiropractic Association, its provincial divisions and CMCC present a brief to the Hall Commission.

1965
The Lacroix Commission releases its report which finds chiropractic is a valuable method of treatment. The report is accepted by the Hall Commission.

British Columbia includes chiropractic in its Medicare plan.

1966
Chiropractic services are included in the Medicare plan for Alberta.

The Government of Canada amends Medicare to include chiropractic treatment.

1967
The CMCC Board of Directors appoints a special committee to locate a new campus at 1900 Bayview Avenue.

1968
CMCC moves into its new campus.

1971
The Ontario Council of Health appoints a Task Force on Chiropractic. Its recommendations include that CMCC should be affiliated with a university.

1973
The Chiropractic Act is passed by the Government of Quebec.

1974
Nova Scotia passes a Chiropractic Act.

1976
A presidential system of governance is adopted by CMCC. Dr. Don Sutherland becomes CMCC’s first president.

1977
CMCC recommends to the Council on Chiropractic Education that an international system of reciprocity for accreditation of chiropractic colleges be established.

1978
The Council on Chiropractic Education (Canada) receives its charter from the Federal Government.

1978
CMCC completes expansion to provide additional office space for administration and faculty and a new student lounge.

1981
CMCC joins the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges in Washington, DC.

1982
CMCC achieves status as a Recognised Candidate for Accreditation with the Council on Chiropractic Education (Canada) and the Council on Chiropractic Education (United States). This permits CMCC graduates to apply for licence in Canada and most of the United States.

1983
Dr. Ian Coulter becomes the first president appointed from outside the chiropractic profession.

1986
CMCC receives a 3 year accreditation from CCE (Canada).

1989
CMCC receives reaffirmation of accreditation for five years.

1990
Newfoundland and Labrador passes a Chiropractic Act completing legislated recognition of chiropractic in all ten provinces.

1991
CMCC appoints Dr. Jean Moss as its first female president.

1994
CMCC acquires additional space from CNIB to accommodate the library, administrative offices, graduate studies and research and Bookstore.

1995
CMCC receives reaffirmation of accreditation for seven years.

Year long celebration of the 50th anniversary of CMCC.
Centennial celebration of the chiropractic profession.
150th anniversary of D. D. Palmer’s birth.

1996
Dr. Jean Moss assumes a second term of her presidency.
CMCC’s first off campus clinic associated with another health care institution opens at St. Michael’s Hospital.

1997
CMCC develops the Institutional Plan.
CMCC opens clinic within St. John’s Rehabilitation Hospital.

1999
Homecoming 1999. CMCC celebrates the 50th anniversary of the first graduating class – the Class of 1949.

2000
Implementation of the new Integrative Curriculum.

2002
On January 31, CMCC becomes owner of a new campus to be built at 6100 Leslie Street.
CMCC starts a campaign to raise funds for the new campus.

2003
Ground Breaking Ceremony at 6100 Leslie Street campus.
Construction in progress.

2003
CMCC faculty become chiropractors-on-staff at St. Michael’s hospital – a first in Canada.

2004
New campus is ready for the academic year starting August 30.
Official Opening Ceremony and celebration September 18.